a dolls house written commentary | Custom PHD Thesis

a dolls house written commentary

A dolls house written commentary
April 30, 2014
An investigation into the consumer behavior of international students in
April 30, 2014

a dolls house written commentary

 

 

A written commentary: A close analysis of a writer’s major choices and their overall effects on the audience. Criterion A is clear enough in its descriptors with some coaching shown in italics.
Major literary features in A Doll’s House:
Setting, character (direct/indirect characterization, foil), conflict, rising action with complications, climax, falling action, resolution, symbolism, theme, situational irony, diction, metaphor, dramatic irony, playwright, audience, stage directions, dialogue, monologue
Level Criterion A: Content
(receptive and productive)
0 The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below.
1-2 * The student demonstrates very limited understanding of the text and topic, and little or no awareness of the author’s choices. There is little or no detail, development or support.
* The use of terminology is missing, inconsistent and/or incorrect.
Very limited understanding of the play or literary terms is shown.
3-4 * The student demonstrates limited understanding of the text and topic, and sometimes shows an awareness of the author’s choices, although detail, development and/or support are insufficient.
• The use of terminology is sometimes accurate and appropriate.
Some understanding of the play and the playwright’s choices are shown, but literary terminology is not understood.
¬5-6 * The student demonstrates a sufficient understanding of the text and topic, and an awareness of the author’s choices, using adequate detail, development and support.
* Terminology is usually accurate and appropriate.
Smaller arguments are made that show sufficient understanding of the scene and the author’s choices .
7-8 * The student demonstrates a good understanding of the text, topic and the author’s choices, using substantial detail, development and support.
* Relevant terminology is used accurately and appropriately.
A well-supported overall argument is created with evidence and analysis, though perceptive understanding of the author’s choices was not achieved. Some literary features are discussed with good understanding.
9-10 * The student demonstrates a perceptive understanding of the text, topic and the author’s choices, consistently using illustrative detail, development and support.
* The student shows a sophisticated command of relevant terminology, and uses it appropriately.
The scene is perceptively understood in terms of its role in the play, the most important literary choices the playwright utilized, the chosen evidence and its intended effects.

 

Level Criterion B- Organization Student Description
The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below.
1-2 * The student rarely employs organizational structures and/or language specific conventions, or uses those that do not serve the context and intention.
* The work is generally disorganized, unclear and/or incoherent.
* The student employs critical apparatus inappropriately or not at all. There is little or no evidence of a thesis statement, introduction, body paragraphs, transitions, or a conclusion.
3-4 * The student sometimes employs organizational structures and/or language-specific conventions that serve the context and intention.
* The work shows the beginnings of organization but lacks coherence.
* The student employs critical apparatus with limited success. Some organizational attempts are apparent, but no major point is introduced, supported, and concluded.
5-6 * The student usually employs organizational structures and language specific conventions that serve the context and intention.
* The work is generally organized, clear and coherent.
* The student generally employs critical apparatus correctly. Each body paragraphs offers a distinct argument and follows the MEAL plan (MAIN, EVIDENCE, ANALYSIS, LINK), but there is not a strong central point/argument/thesis.
7-8 * The student consistently employs organizational structures and language specific conventions that serve the context and intention.
* The work is usually well-organized, clear and coherent and the ideas being expressed build on each other.
* The student employs critical apparatus correctly. Each body paragraphs offers a distinct argument and follows the MEAL plan (MAIN, EVIDENCE, ANALYSIS, LINK).and connects back to a central thesis with transitions.
9-10 * The student consistently employs sophisticated organizational structures and language-specific conventions that serve the context and intention.
* The work is consistently well-organized, clear and coherent and the ideas being expressed build on each other in a sophisticated manner.
* The student integrates critical apparatus correctly and effectively. A clear thesis is introduced at the start. Each body paragraphs offers a distinct argument and follows the MEAL plan (MAIN, EVIDENCE, ANALYSIS, LINK) to support that thesis. Body paragraphs are arranged in a clear order with transitions that show the order of most important decisions, chronological order of what the playwright does in the scene, or any order that has ideas that build on one another.)

Criterion C- Style and Language Mechanics Student Description
1-2 * The student employs a very limited range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. There are very frequent errors in grammar and syntax, which persistently hinder communication.
* There is little or no evidence of a register and style that serve the context and intention.
* There are very frequent errors in punctuation and spelling/writing, which persistently hinder communication. The criteria are clear enough, but here are some additional coaching tips:
Register = formal, with a focus on the scene. No use of personal pronouns should be used (I, we, you) and it should be about what the author did and not about what you think of the scene. In other words, it is an analysis of the writing—not a personal response.

The top band can be reached with strong sentence variety, careful word choice/vocabulary, correct integration of quotations, and very infrequent errors.
3-4 * The student employs a limited range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. There are frequent errors in grammar and syntax, which hinder communication.
* There is some evidence of a register and style that serve the context and intention.
* There are frequent errors in punctuation and spelling/writing, which hinder communication.
5-6 * The student generally employs a range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are generally accurate; occasional errors sometimes hinder communication.
* The student often uses a register and style that serve the context and intention.
* Punctuation and spelling/writing are generally accurate; occasional errors sometimes hinder communication.
7-8 * The student employs a range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are accurate; occasional errors rarely hinder communication.
* The student consistently uses a register and style that serve the context and intention.
* Punctuation and spelling/writing are accurate; occasional errors rarely hinder communication.
9-10 * The student employs a wide and effective range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure. Grammar and syntax are accurate; very infrequent errors do not hinder communication.
*The student demonstrates mastery of a register and style that serve the context and intention.
* Punctuation and spelling/writing are accurate; very infrequent errors do not hinder communication.
A Doll’s House Writing Assessment Task Sheet:
Use this sheet to plan your work and choose one of the following models for your analysis.

You should aim to write at least a 4 paragraph essay during the lesson. You can go further, but we are looking for at least 2 very well constructed body paragraphs that display your content knowledge of “A Doll’s House” as well as the use and effects of dramatic devices.

Using the MEALplan approach to paragraphing is an expectation of this essay.

Remember, Henrik Ibsen wrote the play, “A Doll’s House” to be performed. So try to refer to choices that Ibsen made when you comment on dramatic devices, as well as considering the response of an audience either at the time, today, or comparing both.

You can also use the “They Say, I Say” bank to sharpen your sense of academic register and the sophistication of the way in which you introduce quotations and move between ideas.

Choose from one of these two models from writing:

Model A: Model B
Introduction: play, author, thematic content, context (historical, social) of the play
Introduction: Introduction: play, author, thematic content, context (historical, social) of the play

Thesis: identify the most prevalent literary devices and develop at least two body paragraphs around these as main ideas (you can, of course—and probably should!—include reference to other dramatic devices)

E.g.
“This passage contributes to the reader’s understanding and appreciation of i) the theme of ______________________ or ii) the characterization of ________________________..”

It does this through the use of (dramatic device X) and (dramatic device Y) Thesis: identify the most important ideas within the extract and these will form the main ideas of your body paragraphs.

E.g.

“This passage contributes to the reader’s understanding and appreciation of i) the theme of ______________________ or ii) the characterization of ________________________…”

It does this by showing the dramatic tension which is revealed through the use of the dramatic devices of
Para 1: Ibsen uses (Dramatic device X) at many points within this passage to show (refer to specific from your passage) Para 1: Your first main idea. Support with reference to dramatic devices employed and choices made by Ibsen.
Para 2: In addition to (Dramatic device X), (Dramatic device Y) at is used to support the idea of ___________ Para 2: Your second main idea. Support with reference to dramatic devices employed by Ibsen.
Para 3: Another dramatic device if you wish. Para 3: Another big idea if you wish.
Conclusion: make a final reflective comment on how effective Ibsen was at conveying these themes or character conflicts to his audience and make a personal comment on the modern relevance of this play. Conclusion: make a final reflective comment on how effective Ibsen was at conveying these themes to his audience and make a personal comment on the modern relevance of this play.
Literary Terms for A Doll’s House Unit

dramatic irony: Irony that is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is
understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters in the play.
Example video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZFYuX84n1U

situational irony: Irony involving a situation in which actions have an effect that is opposite from what was intended, so that the outcome is contrary to what was expected.
Example video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqg6RO8c_W0

tone: a particular quality, way of sounding, modulation, or intonation of the voice as expressive of some meaning, feeling, spirit, etc. Ex. a tone of command.
symbolism: A symbol is an object that represents, stands for, or represents something else, like an idea, visual image, belief, or action. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SydKhlUmfqQ

setting: The locale or period in which the action of a novel, play, film, etc., takes place. In drama, this can often be communicated through the set, costuming, and even lines of the characters. Ex. The setting of this story is Verona in the 15th century.

costume: dress or garb characteristic of another period, place, person, etc., as worn on the stage or at balls.

monologue: In origin, the words are doublets: Greek monologue and Latin soliloquy (separate term) both mean ‘single speech’. But they are now distinguished in performances with monologue as a speech made by one person in the company of others while a soliloquy is spoken by one person who is alone. A monologue is a long speech delivered by one person who forgets or neglects the others who are there, with an example being "The Vagina Monologues." Hamlet’s "To be or not to be" is a great example of a soliloquy. We also think of monologue in the context of late-night talk shows or comedy clubs where the host or performer does a stand-up comedy routine

aside: a remark or passage by a character in a play that is intended to be heard by the audience but unheard by the other characters in the play.

theme: A main idea or an underlying meaning of a literary work which may be stated directly or indirectly.
so basically write a 4 paragraph essay about a dolls house, but mainly focus on page 80 and 81, i will upload. chose one of the templates and then just write
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