Vampires in the Lemon Grove | Custom PHD Thesis

Vampires in the Lemon Grove

Validate the Reporting of Data and Information
April 28, 2014
Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney
April 28, 2014

Vampires in the Lemon Grove

Remember, a thorough essay should contain an introduction with a precise thesis sentence, an essay map that presents the points that you will address in support of your thesis, a body composed of well-organized paragraphs unified by topic sentences, and a conclusion that sums up and states the significance of your topic. Also, the essays should cite specific instances from texts we have read and/or watched this semester to help "prove" their points.

While you may refer to any texts we have read or watched this semester, you MUST include in your discussion at least two of the stories from Vampires in the Lemon Grove (“Vampires in the Lemon Grove,” “Reeling for the Empire,” or “The Graveless Doll of Eric Mutis” AND either “Hush,” Buffy the Vampire Slayer; “Blink,” Dr. Who; or the episode of Scooby Doo we watched.
Your essay should demonstrate that you have read the texts (or the assigned parts of them) and thought about them carefully. You must also correctly cite your sources within the text of your essay; you are not required to do a works cited page. As in any essay, you must cite your sources even when you do not quote them directly. If, however, you use a text’s exact words, you must cite and use quotation marks.

If you wish the exam to receive a grade better than a D, your essay must have an introduction, at least 3 body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. Plan your essays so that the thesis is in the introduction. Make it a real thesis, not a statement of intent or a question.

Choose one and ONLY ONE of the bulleted prompt options below. Your essay should address your responses to ALL of the questions in the bulleted prompt that you select. It should not, however, feel as if you are responding to a checklist, particularly as they questions are related. Use transitions and synthesize.

? Why do we need monsters? How do they apply to our society and culture, and where are they going? In addressing this prompt, please discuss the evolution of monsters—their past, present, and future.
? What does “monster” really mean? In other words, how are monsters relevant? Why are we scared of them? To what extent do perception, fear, and our preoccupation with control figure into our ideas about monsters?
The text that we have read during the semester 3 articles which are:

1/ “Why Study Monsters” from David D. Gilmore’s Monsters: Evil Beings, Mythical Beasts, and All Manner of Imaginary Terrors, published in 2003 by University of Pennsylvania Press in Philadelphia.

2/ “Monsters and the Moral Imagination,” written by Stephen T. Asma. Was published in Volume 56, Issue 10 of Chronicle of Higher Education on 30 October 2009.

3/ “Why we Crave Horror Movie” by Stephen King-reprinted in the seventh edition of Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum (pages 784-86) edited by Laurence Longman; Copyright 1982; originally appeared in playboy.

Also, we watched movies which are:
1/ The Conjuring
2/ Young Frankenstein

The stories:

Vampires in the Lemon Grove (“Vampires in the Lemon Grove,” “Reeling for the Empire,” or “The Graveless Doll of Eric Mutis” AND either “Hush,” Buffy the Vampire Slayer; “Blink,” Dr. Who; or the episode of Scooby Doo we watched.
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